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Urania Clementino
Urania (pron.: /jʊˈreɪniə/; Ancient Greek: Οὐρανία; meaning 'heavenly' or 'of heaven') was, in Greek mythology, the muse of astronomy and a daughter of Zeus by Mnemosyne and also a granddaughter of Uranus. Some accounts list Urania as the mother of the musician Linus by Apollo, and Hymenaeus also is said to have been a son of Urania.

Urania is usually represented with a celestial globe to which she points with a little staff. Urania is able to foretell the future by the arrangement of the stars. Urania is often associated with Universal Love and the Holy Spirit. Eldest of the divine sisters, Urania inherited Zeus' majesty and power and the beauty and grace of her mother Mnemosyne.

Urania dresses in a cloak embroidered with stars and keeps her eyes and attention focused on the Heavens. Those who are most concerned with philosophy and the heavens are dearest to Urania. Those who have been instructed by her Urania raises aloft to heaven, for it is a fact that imagination and the power of thought lift men's souls to heavenly heights.

Urania, o'er her star-bespangled lyre,
With touch of majesty diffused her soul;
A thousand tones, that in the breast inspire,
Exalted feelings, o er the wires'gan roll—
How at the call of Jove the mist unfurled,
And o'er the swelling vault—the glowing sky,
The new-born stars hung out their lamps on high,
And rolled their mighty orbs to music's sweetest sound.
— From An Ode To Music by James G. Percival

During the Renaissance, Urania began to be considered the Muse for Christian poets. In the invocation to Book 7 of John Milton's epic poem Paradise Lost, the poet invokes Urania to aid his narration of the creation of the cosmos, though he cautions that it is "[t]he meaning, not the name I call" (7.5).

Muse magazine features Urania as one of the characters in the "Kokopelli and Co." comic strip by Larry Gonick published in each issue of the magazine. She is the only original muse who remains among the "new muses" featured in the magazine.

 

 

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About the Ancient Muses | 3 Boeotian Muses | Aoide | Melete | Mneme

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